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going the wrong way in connecticut. tonight, officials say they are ready to crack down. and here's abc's senior national correspondent jim avila. >> reporter: it is a frightening sight with tragic consequences -- the wrong way driver. >> oh my god! >> reporter: nearly 400 people die each year from wrong way driving. most from head-on, high speed accidents. in fact, 22% of wrong way crashes are fatal, compared to less than 1% of all other crashes. just last night -- >> i just passed a wrong way driver. >> two cars completely destroyed on the highway. >> reporter: three people in connecticut died when a wrong way driver caused a head-on crash on the same day the national transportation safety board launched a nationwide crackdown. >> and they're completely preventable. >> reporter: who's responsible? 15% involve drivers more than 70 years old. but the real danger is alcohol. 60% of wrong way accidents are caused by drunk drivers, nearly 10% by repeat offenders, which is why the ntsb is recommending that all 50 states require this ignition lock on all cars driven by anyone convicted of du
and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he prompely declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6
protein. zero fat. in blueberry/pomegranate and peach. megyn: connecticut senator are you comard bloomingthal promised to take on the tobacco companies. in the homes of using the proceeds to fund programs that would convince people to stop smoking. the tobacco industry was forced to pay millions in compensation. the money went to the states and now there is an eye-opening report on where that money is going. >> reporter: between the settlements and tobacco taxes u.s. states are expected to take in $25 billion this year. but they are expected to spend less than 2% of that money on smoking prevention program. that according to a report of coalition of public health organizations. nearly half of the states provide less than 10% of the funding the cdc recommends for anti-to be program. only the states in green are providing 50% of the recommended funding. >> north dakota and alaska are the on two states funding at the level recommended about it cdc. >> reporter: u.s. cigarette manufacturers agreed to pay $246 billion over 25 years to compensate states for public health costs related
, sciu president mary kay henry. thank you for joining us. coming up, connecticut is kind of sort of one-time democrat joe lieberman bids a heart felt adu to the senate. we'll take a look at the former vp candidate swan song. next. [ female announcer ] born from the naturally sweet monk fruit, something this delicious could only come from nature. now from the maker of splenda sweeteners, discover nectresse. the only 100% natural, no-calorie sweetener made from the goodness of fruit. the rich, sweet taste of sugar. nothing artificial. ♪ it's all that sweet ever needs to be. new nectresse. sweetness naturally. new nectresse. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last
the proceeds are going to help sandy victims in new york, new jersey, and connecticut. >>> all right. now here's your first look at this morning's dish of "scrambled politics." barbara waltered asked chris christie a question you may have had on your mind. >> there are people who say that you couldn't be president because you're so heavy. what do you say to them? >> that's ridiculous. i mean that's ridiculous. >> well, an unpaid 18-year-old intern for bob menendez is arrested after it was learned that intern was an undocumented immigrant and registered sex offender. immigration officials deny reports of the arrest were delayed until after election day. >>> for the first time ever, our nbc news/"wall street journal" poll finds that a majority of americans favor same-sex marriage. >>> the mitt romney campaign ad about jeep manufacturing being outsourced to china has been declared the lie of the year. >>> and finally, new mexico senator jeff bigaman went on the colbert report and you can say stretched the truth a bit. >> we know the house of representative is a bunch of losers compared you to guy
of connecticut gave his last speech as a senator on saturday. take a listen to this. >> mr. president, my fourth and final term as the united states senator will soon come to an end. as i reflect on that reality, i am of course filled with many emotions. but the one that i feel most is gratitude. i leave this chamber as full of faith and the dream called america. as when i stood here near a quarter century ago to take the oath of office for the first time. thank you, all. i have a lot to be grateful for. >> dana: he is a very honorable man. wonderful united states senator. i think he will go down well in history and exciting to see what he does next. thank, senator lieberman for all you did. >> eric: thank you, sir, as well. andrea, you're up. >> andrea: the other day i was in my kitchen and watching a movie while i'm cooking and it goes to commercial break and the commercial was so loud i jumped. but guess what? starting today. no more. congress has done something positive with their time. they passed a law making it illegal i guess for advertisers to raise the volume on commercials above two d
will be gone. massachusetts and connecticut will be out of the ski business completely. you can only adapt so much before you say the revenue is not there to keep the doors open. sandra: what are your forecasters telling you now about the coming year? obviously we just had, last winter was the fourth warmest on record since 1896. things should get better from that, right? >> well we sure hope so but we're looking at the long-term trend. when you look at climate change you can't predict individual weather patterns over the next week or the next month. we're looking at the long-term trend. up fortunately as you mentioned we're working on the first 11 months of this year are the hottest on record in the united states. we have to go after the problem the problem is industrial carbon pollution. we have to strike a blow against climate change. sandra: we have to leave it there, bob but i'm wondering, can't we just keep making snow? can't we put snow on those mountains you know? it is expensive i know. >> it's expensive. half a million dollars a year on average for a ski resort to make its own snow.
. they are surging repossessions up in and 84% jump in new jersey and up as well in connecticut. you don't need a crystal ball it see the future. just the foreclosure starts numbers. that the first stage of foreclosure in new york, new jersey, arkansas and washington. you see the repo man will be busy there in 2013. now, home prices have been rising nicely. but this new supply of bank-owned properties coming to market next year could temper though gains a bit and remember, the overall drop in foreclosure activity is due it a big jump in short sales and principal reduction loan mods and those are on the fiscal cliff if we lose on the forgiveness. we have plenty more to look at on the facebook page, so go ahead and go to it, as well as the blog. sue? >> thanks, we will. >> the global natural resources continues. they just inked a joint venture with aca. you see the stock pop reopen. it was halted for trading. they are doing a joint venture in canada for space of land that could have up to 9 billion barrels ever oil or equivalent. they are paying a billion up front at close. another billion over f
to the people of connecticut who have entrusted me with the privilege of public service for 40 years, the last 24 in the united states senate. gratitude to my senate colleagues to micom tanakh as france and the tablet has been such an honor to serve. gratitude to other people without whose help, hard work and the port, i never would have made it to the senate or state here. the gifted and hard-working staff in connecticut and washington are supported, informed and enrichment service here in the volunteers in my campaign to give so much and asked for nothing in return except that i do what i believe is right. gratitude to all those who labor out of view in the corridors of this capitol building from the maintenance crews to the capitol police and everybody else anywhere in this building. thank you for keeping our capital running in keeping us safe. and gratitude, most of all to my family and they've given me every day of my life. my parents, grandparents and siblings, children and grandchildren and my wife of almost 30 years now, the love of my life who has been my constant companion supporter
funding for new jersey and new york particularly. i think connecticut maybe too. for the damage for hurricane sandy. he's doing that at the request of the governors there and republicans in congress are now saying do they really need that much money? was there really that much damage to hurricane sandy? haven't they been watching tv? >> they've been dodging the question about whether they should offset the cost of it. i think when -- i think boehner has so much on his plate right now. that he's going to let this through. he just doesn't want to say it. but you know, obviously this is another thing that conservatives are pushing for. so it's a tough spot. especially because i had forgotten about cantor and that damage when he said back then. he kind of retreated subsequently because he got flak for it. >> bill: here's what i would like to see. i would like to see whoever these members of congress are republicans in congress that are questioning the amount of storm damage in new jersey, i would like to see them s
, and connecticut. they know these places that have been hit so hard by sandy because they are their hometowns. that was really wonderful to see them come out and support their communities. we believe that $30 million was raised in ticket sales and we're still waiting for the final tally for all the donations called in from around the world last night. the money will go to hurricane victims through the robin hood foundation. a mazing effort last night. i only wish i had a ticket to see it in person. that's the latest from madison square garden. i'll send it back to you in the studio. >> steve: it was on 30 different tv channels. my wife watched the whole thing. >> brian: i think the dvd is going to be released. correct? >> steve: and you can buy the itunes songs and the money goes to robin hood. >> gretchen: i hoped you dvd, 'cause i didn't see one second. since the storm is going to cost $60 billion, hopefully a lot of this money will help defray some of those costs. >> brian: per state. >> steve: yeah. meanwhile, we got other stories making headlines on this thursday morning. while you were
, connecticut. some towns are now on capitol hill today. they are painting a vivid picture of this massive damage done in nir communities. joining us live from the rotunda, hoboken mayor dawn zimmer. ufs you were testifying about how small businesses have struggled here. tell us about what's going on in hoboken, what do you need? >> part of my message is hoboken is very much open for business. we have fantastic restaurants and nightlife and shopping and washington street was not flooded. many of our businesses have been impacted by the closure of the path, 60%. some businesses are reporting as much as 60% down in business. my main concern is the 200 or so businesses off of washington street who are struggling to either stay open, operating in an alternate location or potentially over the next several months could be forced to close down. that's my focus right now. >> i understand there was $1 hundred million in damage in hoboken. what is the main source of revenue for helping people get back to work and get back to business? >> well, for businesses the only option for them from the federal
connecticut, maryland, some of the other states that were hit as well. what is your number that you put out in your testimony? >> there are the firms that we have looked at from the population information that were in the primary disaster area. these are the ones that incurred the worst of the storm. >> how do these jive with the fema numbers? >> the theme and numbers include primary and secondary areas. they had significant disruption of businesses, but not as much physical disaster in our estimation. >> different numbers for new jersey and new york, what would your numbers be for new jersey? and if you would give those for the record, my other question is, if you do your normal business with 24 regional centers and 35 out reach offices, how do you handle a surge? if you are processing the daily requirements, they have got to be less than 10% of the pressures that you are feeling now, how are you not surging your capacity to take care of the requests that must be flying out right now? >> what we did immediately was exhaust my annual travel budget by transferring people into the impact area
to an 18-year-old latino in los angeles, as a 65-year-old banker in greenwich, connecticut? >> doesn't that come down to the candidate? >> it comes down to everything. you know, the first rule of engagement is to engage. and just like last time i saw mika, she was dancing salsa at our reagan awards dinner, if you remember. >> wow! that's engagement. >> that's -- you know, that's a point. and i'm just not being -- i'm just not trying to bring levity into the equation. >> but you've got to engage! >> but you've got to engage. you know, when we have the republican national convention, what did i do? >> al, is it fair to say that if you've got a candidate that's dweeding america between 47% and 53%, that may not engage the way we need to engage? >> if you have a candidate who doesn't speak to 100% of america, he'll lose. someone won't buy it, but at least most americans will believe i may or may not vote for you, but i know you care. the most significant question asked in the polling data in the election i thought was, does so and so care for people like me? and if you're scoring 38%, yo
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14